Breaking down the CC licenses


Distinguish between the different parts of a CC license and what they mean.

Overview

Creative Commons licenses are made up of four conditions that can be mixed and matched to create six different license combinations. The licenses also come in three formats: human-readable, lawyer-readable, and machine-readable. 

The following video from CC New Zealand is a great five minute introduction to all the parts of a CC license. 

After watching the video, if you still want more detail about how the licenses work and what the spectrum of licenses looks like, CC has a simple, concise page that explains it all in text

Exercise

Here is a quick exercise to test your understanding of CC licenses. Below are a few different kinds of icons that all mark works with different CC licenses. For each one, explain in a sentence or two what you can and cannot do with works that someone has shared under that license. Share your sentences, and any questions that come up, below.

 

Hint

Don't know which icon represents which license? Try selecting different options with CC's license chooser tool.

Task Discussion


  • nicoleta_craciun said:

    CC BY-ND  I am free to reproduce, distribute, communicate to the public, publicly display  and perform the work. I must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or who gave me the license. I can not  alter or transform this work 
    CC BY-NC-SA I am free to reproduce, distribute, communicate to the public and perform the work, to make derivative works. I must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or who gave me the license.  I can not use this work for commercial purposes. If I transform this work, or if I use it to create another one, I can distribute the resulting work only under a license identical to this one.
    CC BY I am free to reproduce, distribute, communicate to the public, perform the work, to modify and to use this work for commercial purposes.I must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or the person who gave me the work licensed
    on March 18, 2014, 12:25 p.m.
  • Elizabeth said:

    #1  - Attribution, No derivs.  Anyone can use it as long as they give you credit, use the whole work and don’t make any changes.  

    #2 -  Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share Alike.  You must be credited, the work can be changed but must be used non-commercially (not for profit). Anyone using it must also use the same licensing.

    #3 -  Attribution only, The only stipulation is that you be credited.  

    on March 14, 2014, 8:45 p.m.
  • Jacob Huff said:

    1. The first license asks that a user attribute the original author, but restrict that user from making a derivative of the work. In other words give credit and don’t make any changes.

     

    2. The second license asks that a user attribute the original author, but restrict that user from making any profit from the work, also it asks them to put the same kind of CC license on the new or used work. In other words give credit (making changes is ok), but do not sell it and keep these restrictions on your new work.

     

    3. Number three asks that you give credit. Done. Do as you will with it as long as you give credit. 

    on March 14, 2014, 10:58 a.m.
  • Joeystarnes said:

    1.  This license means that a user must give attribution and it must remain as is; it may not be changed in any way.

     

    2.  This license permits a user to manipulate the original work and requires that one give credit to the creator and maintain the same license in the new version.

     

    3.  This allows for the broadest use of material.  Someone can reuse, modify, repurpose, even for commercial uses, as long as the original creator receives attribution.

    on March 12, 2014, 3:30 p.m.

    Jane Park said:

    Remember that #2 also does not permit commercial use!

    on March 17, 2014, 5:28 p.m. in reply to Joeystarnes
  • Sharlene Paxton said:

    CC BY-ND allows for liberal reuse with attribution but no changes

    CC BY-NC-SA others can make derivations but no commercial reuse is allowed; attribution is required and the user must license as SA (share-alike)

    CC BY requires attribution; it's the most liberal of licenses and would be used by someone who really wants to share freely

    on March 12, 2014, 2:09 a.m.
  • Laura said:

    Hi to everybody =)


    Well, those licenses work like following:

    CC BY-ND :  this license allows the redistribution commercial goals or not, and of course, it should be with the atribution to the author. Furthermore, the redistribution should not be modified.
     
    CC BY-NC-SA: this license doesn't appear in the main page in the web (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/) but I understand that the work can share with atribution to the author, without commercial goals and it should be share with the same characteristics. In difference with the first, in this we can modify the work.

    CC BY: this is the license that are considered as "free culture", because allows practically everything. We can share the work and everything we want to, and it should be atributed to the author. It is like a open source, and maybe represents that the derivated works can't be they reproduced and shared.

    on March 9, 2014, 1:01 a.m.

    Jane Park said:

    Hi Laura -- CC BY-NC-SA does appear at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/

    in the lower left! It also links to the deed at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

    on March 10, 2014, 6:41 p.m. in reply to Laura

    Laura said:

    Thanks, although I get de right answer anyway, hehehe. I had understood CC apart, but no.

    on March 15, 2014, 8:41 p.m. in reply to Jane Park
  • Renato Santos said:

    In all licences the credits have to be guarantied. So the author has to be mentioned when his work is used.

    CC BY-ND 
    we cant: change the work.
    we can: use it for commercial and non commercial purposes; 

    CC BY-NC-SA
    we cant: use it for commercial and non commercial purposes; change the licence type for the new works;
    we can: change the work; 

    CC BY
    We can: do everything: Distribute, rebuild, remix, commercialize it. (just don't forget the credits)

    on March 3, 2014, 10:14 p.m.

    Jane Park said:

    Renato -- re CC BY-NC-SA -- you can use it for noncommercial purposes.

    on March 10, 2014, 6:37 p.m. in reply to Renato Santos
  • Stephanie said:

    The first icon is the Attribution-No Derivs which allows you to redistribute  work as long as it is unchanged. This would be useful for a photographer who wants to allow others to use their photos as long as they are not edited. 

    The second icon is the Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share Alike which allows others to change or add to the work for non-commercial use. The work must be credited to the orginal creator and licensed  under the same terms. 

    The final icon is Atttibution only which allows others to distribute, edit and add to the work, even commercially, as long as they credit the original creator.

    on Feb. 27, 2014, 1:02 p.m.
  • Lena said:

       

    With this license, one can use the work, but must give the creator credit and must not change, alter or remix the work. The user can benefit commercially from the work.

     

    With this licence, the one can use the work, but must give the creator credit and must not benefit commerically from the work. The user may alter the work, but this new altered work must have the same licenses as the original work.

     

    With this license, one can use the work, but must give the creator credit. The user may alter the work, benefit commerically from its distrubtion, and make the new work with whatever licenses the user chooses. This is most accomodating of the CC licenses. 

    on Oct. 24, 2013, 3:23 p.m.
  • Sabrina said:

     

     

    1. this allows your work to be commercialy and noncommercially redistributed as long as it is unchanged and credited to you
    2. this allows your work to be tweaked and mixed and only shared noncommercially as long as you are credited and the new work is ensured under the same licenses
    3.  this allows others to tweak and change your work and share it commercially and noncommercially as long as you are credited for the original work
    on Oct. 22, 2013, 9:35 a.m.
  • joec said:

    CC BY-ND  user is free to reproduce, distribute, distribute, display  and perform the work in public. However, user must attribute the work in the manner specified by the creator /licensor. No dirivatives or alterations or remixes/remashs of this work allowed 
    CC BY-NC-SA User is free to reproduce, distribute, communicate, display, and perform the work in public and even to make derivative works, remixes or mash ups but user must attribute the work in the manner specified by the creator. User can not use this work for commercial purposes. If user modifies the work, or makes a derivitive work, this work must be released only under a license giving identical cc rights.
    CC BY User is free to reproduce, distribute, communicate, display or perform the work in public, or to modify, remix, remash this work and even to use the resulting derivitive work for commercial purposes.User must attribute the work in the manner specified by the creator/licensor. No requirement to license derivitive works under same terms as the original work.
    on Sept. 19, 2013, 6:18 p.m.
  • Jeannette M E Lee said:

    1. CC-BY-ND allows commerical and non-commerical redistribution of unchanged work credited to licensor.
    2. CC-BY-NC-SA allows remixing, tweaking, and building upon work non-commerically provided original work is credited to licensor. All derived creations must have the same license as the original work.
    3. CC-BY allows distribution, remxing, tweaking, and building upon commerically and non-commerically provided the original work is credited to licensor.
    on Aug. 12, 2013, 12:13 p.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 12, 2013, 12:14 p.m. in reply to Jeannette M E Lee
  • Maria Teresa said:

     
    CC BY-ND  I am free to reproduce, distribute, communicate to the public, publicly display  and perform the work. I must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or who gave me the license. I can not  alter or transform this work 
    CC BY-NC-SA I am free to reproduce, distribute, communicate to the public, publicly display, and perform the work, to make derivative works. I must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or who gave me the license.  I can not use this work for commercial purposes. If I transform this work, or if I use it to create another one, I can distribute the resulting work only under a license identical to this one.
    CC BY I am free to reproduce, distribute, communicate to the public, publicly display, perform the work, to modify and to use this work for commercial purposes.I must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or the person who gave me the work licensed
    on Aug. 12, 2013, 9:02 a.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 12, 2013, 9:03 a.m. in reply to Maria Teresa
  • Clare Forrest said:

    1. You can use this work as long as you credit the author and don't change it in any way.

    2. You can use this work as long as you credit the author, use it non-commericially (make no money from what you do with the original work) and license the new derivative work under the identical terms.

    3. You can use this work however you like as long as you attribute the original author's work.

    on Aug. 10, 2013, 5:28 a.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 10, 2013, 5:29 a.m. in reply to Clare Forrest
  • Chris Dillon said:

    1. This licence allows us to freely redistribute/share content both non-commercially (as is common) and commercially. The product cannot however be altered, repackaged etc., must remain whole, and must be attributed to the original author/creator.
    2. This license allows the sharing (copying, distributing or transmitting) of the work including remixing or adaptions. The work or any remix must be attributed to the original author/creator, however, it is must remain non-commercial.
    3. This is the CC License Button "BY". CC buttons describe a key term of the licenses. "BY" is Attribution, ie. the work must be attributed as specified by the author, but not in a way that suggests the author endorses you or your use of the the work.

    I was a bit confused by the last one. Buttons are mearly a device and can be used in conjunction with other buttons. So the presence of "BY" (as some other postees seem to suggest) is not in itself simply open rights to copy et.al only with Attribution.

    on Aug. 7, 2013, 12:36 a.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 7, 2013, 12:37 a.m. in reply to Chris Dillon

    Jane Park said:

    Re 2 - remember that any derviatives must be shared alike under the same CC BY-NC-SA license.

    Re 3 - that's a good point. The attribution symbol alone doesn't necessarily indicate the CC BY license. In this case, however, it does, as we are asking you to identify the associated license and C BY is the only one that makes sense.

    on Aug. 8, 2013, 7:24 p.m. in reply to Chris Dillon

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 8, 2013, 7:25 p.m. in reply to Jane Park

    Sérgio Leal said:

    Good point Chris and Jane.

    Not to carry the information that mean the 3 licenses, just like to mention that I use the material I produce the license Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike CC BY-NC-SA

    on Aug. 19, 2013, 5:59 p.m. in reply to Jane Park
  • Ayla Stein said:

    1. You can share this content, commercially and non-commercially, as long as you give credit to the original creator. However, the original work cannot be changed or shortened or in any way manipulated. 

    2. You can share the content as long as you give credit to the creator and you do not make money off of redistributing any derivatives. Any derivatives must be licensed with the same license as the original content. 

    3. You can freely redistribute the content, create and share derivatives for free or for profit as long as credit is given to the original creator. 

    I am kind of confused by the CC BY-ND license. Does this mean that anyone can share your content and demand money for it as long as they give credit to the creator? I thought the commercial/non-commercial was specific to derivatives because how can anyone sell your work and not give you any of the profits?

    on July 30, 2013, 3:26 p.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on July 30, 2013, 3:27 p.m. in reply to Ayla Stein

    Jane Park said:

    One possible use case is someone including a CC BY-ND licensed article within a book and selling the book. Because commercial use is allowed, the use of the article in this context woul be allowed. But the article itself would have to be attributed properly, and if there is a CC license on it, then the free version will always be available for free so the user knows that they don't have to buy the book just to access the one article.

    on Aug. 8, 2013, 7:22 p.m. in reply to Ayla Stein

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 8, 2013, 7:23 p.m. in reply to Jane Park

    hardcorekancil said:

    Ok, this answers a question I had as well about whether the subsequent commercial use could enclose the original work and prevent the original creator from using it in any way they please.

    on Aug. 12, 2013, 12:21 p.m. in reply to Jane Park

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 12, 2013, 12:22 p.m. in reply to hardcorekancil

    Jane Park said:

    Yeah -- that couldn't happen because the original creator who owns the copyright on the work can continue to distribute their work however they wish! Also, CC licenses are perpetual, so even if the original licensor decided to change the license and/or enter into an exclusive agreement to sell the work to a publisher down the line, the original work accessed on the original date under the CC license would still be available for others to use.

    on Aug. 12, 2013, 9:02 p.m. in reply to hardcorekancil

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on Aug. 12, 2013, 9:03 p.m. in reply to Jane Park
  • edb3 said:

    1. Any use needs to reference the original creator. The work cannot be changed from the original. No restriction on commercial use or licensing conditions to apply to the new work (aside from BY carrying through).

    2. Any use needs to reference the original creator, be for non-commercial purpose, and have the same licencing conditions apply to the new use.

    3. Any use needs to reference the original creator.

    on July 30, 2013, 8:21 a.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on July 30, 2013, 8:22 a.m. in reply to edb3
  • Juan Diego Polo said:

    1 - You must say who the original author is and you can not change the work (edit photo, change text, etc)

    2. You must say who the author is and you can not use de work to commercial commercial purposes. If you share the content, it must be shared with the same rights as the original work.

    2. You must say who the original author is.

    on July 26, 2013, 9:19 a.m.

    kslattery said:

     I am out of the classroom until August 20th. Have a great summer break!
    on July 26, 2013, 9:40 a.m. in reply to Juan Diego Polo
  • sbradley said:

    •  Non commercial, unchanged sharing with credit to creator
    • Build upon under same terms, non commercial with credit to originator
    • Build upon and credit originator.
    on May 27, 2013, 9:11 a.m.